Whidbey Island Critters

Fish & Invertebrate sightings and descriptions, hosted by resident NWDC ID expert Janna Nichols (nwscubamom).
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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:18 am

Although it is hard to figure out where the heads and tails are, these White Bubble Shell snails are engaged in making more White Bubble Shell snails.
They have yellow egg ribbons to show for their effort. :)
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Tangfish
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Tangfish » Sat Jun 25, 2016 7:05 pm

Sea urchins are apparently the zombies of the sea!

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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Sat Jun 25, 2016 4:09 pm

The prevailing theory of the evolution of aging holds that aging is a side effect of genes that promote growth and development of organisms that have a low likelihood of continued survival in the wild once they have reproduced. Many organisms with a low expectation of survival in the wild experience rapid decline once they have reached reproductive maturity.
But Bodnar and Coffman's findings contradict that theory. They found that although the variegated sea urchin, L. variegatus, has a much lower life expectancy in the wild than the other two species they studied, it displayed no evidence of a decline in regenerative capacity with age, which suggests that senescence may not be tied to a short life expectancy in the wild.
The scientists are planning future studies to identify why short-lived sea urchins experience negligible senescence, and, in particular, the role of the immune system in maintaining youthful function into old age.

At the moment, I got plenty of wrinkles. I got to talk to the Keystone urchins about their secret :)

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Desert Diver
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Desert Diver » Sat Jun 25, 2016 3:58 pm

So what does aging really mean? I feel your aches and pains...no I guess those are my own, but if the lifespans are relatively fixed even without aging does this mean without aging we would reach the same ages that we do but without the wrinkles, and then die?

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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Sat Jun 25, 2016 1:39 pm

Desert Diver wrote:
Jan K wrote:they might not get old, but they do get sick and get eaten :eek:


That would not explain why different types have different lifespans, unless the wolf eel like one more than the other!


The scientists did not explain why different sea urchins have different lifespans. Just that regardless of that, they don't show sign of aging.
Unlike me, who at this very moment feels pains and aches ...

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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Desert Diver » Sat Jun 25, 2016 12:46 pm

Jan K wrote:they might not get old, but they do get sick and get eaten :eek:


That would not explain why different types have different lifespans, unless the wolf eel like one more than the other!

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Tangfish
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Tangfish » Sat Jun 25, 2016 10:58 am

So much info I have always wanted to know!

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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby GearHead » Sat Jun 25, 2016 10:53 am

Thank you! I have often wondered what type of clam is buried beneath the sand. This is a great pictorial.


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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Sat Jun 25, 2016 9:36 am

Ever wondered what clam is buried under the siphon peeking out from the sand ?
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Tangfish » Fri Jun 24, 2016 1:26 pm

Now I'm gonna feel a lot more conflicted about feeding an immortal being to a hungry wolf eel!

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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Fri Jun 24, 2016 1:17 pm

they might not get old, but they do get sick and get eaten :eek:

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Desert Diver
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Desert Diver » Fri Jun 24, 2016 1:05 pm

Question that was not answered is if they don't age, why do they die?

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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Tangfish » Fri Jun 24, 2016 12:35 pm

Such pretty eggs, Jan! Also, I had no idea that sea urchins don't age!

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Scubie Doo
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Scubie Doo » Fri Jun 24, 2016 10:15 am

Love the drawing on this one Jan :)

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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Fri Jun 24, 2016 10:06 am

Tubesnouts at Keystone shallows caring for next generation ...
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Thu Jun 23, 2016 9:16 am

Don't like getting old? In your next life, try to become a sea urchin :)
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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:17 am

The tiny doughnut shaped eggs laid by these small snails are easily spotted on many of the kelp and Green sea lettuce seaweed at Keystone shallows.
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Tue Jun 21, 2016 6:48 am

Another fish adding to the schools of babies swimming in our murky waters these days...
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Sun Jun 19, 2016 6:46 am

Happy Father's Day !
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Sat Jun 18, 2016 5:47 pm

Another favorable tide cycle at Deception Pass.
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Thu Jun 16, 2016 1:28 pm

I was very young when I saw this movie:
"Vynález zkázy premiered in Czechoslovakia on 22 August 1958,[ and was featured at Expo 58 in Brussels, where it won the Grand Prix at the International Film Festival.Over the following year, the film also garnered a Silver Sombrero at the First International Film Festival in Guadalajara, a Czechoslovak Film Critics Award, a Crystal Star from the French Academy of Film, and other awards. In France, André Bazin praised the film in Cahiers du cinéma, and Paul Louis Thirard reviewed it warmly in Positif. The director Alain Resnais named it as one of the ten best films of the year. The film was screened by the Museum of Modern Art in December 2012 as part of the exhibition An Auteurist History of Film. MoMA's film curator Charles Silver called the film "a bubbling over […] of unprecedented imagination" with "an undeniably poetic fairy-tale quality." It was screened again in New York City in August 2014 by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, as part of the series "Strange Lands: International Sci-Fi." In The Village Voice, Alan Scherstuhl commented that "The handmade dazzlements still dazzle today … Could it be that old special effects, dependent upon camera tricks and theatrical invention, stir something sympathetic in us that glossy pixels do not, inviting us not just to dream along with the fantasy but also the painstaking creation thereof?"
The baby Lumpsuckers I saw yesterday at Keystone brought back memories ...
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Jan K
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:01 pm

Driftwood Park - some crabs around there, but this is the time for Moon jellies, one even with SEVEN instead the normal four gonads !
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Tue Jun 14, 2016 6:36 am

This Painted greenling male guarded three egg clusters, each one in different stage of development.
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby Jan K » Mon Jun 13, 2016 8:54 pm

Romantic pairs at Keystone...
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Re: Whidbey Island Critters

Postby YellowEye » Thu Jun 09, 2016 3:01 pm

Nice work Jan!
I hope those guys eat up all the barnacles that have been plaguing keystone a bit. Let us know how it goes? Do they leave ugly empty shells behind?


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